Energy Security

14.09.2015

Just an Oil Company? The True Extent of Russia’s Dependency on Oil and Gas

Official statistics suggest that Russia’s oil and gas industry accounts for only a quarter of the country’s GDP. However, when other factors are factored in, the economy is seen to be much more heavily dependent on hydrocarbons. With oil prices looking set to stay low for a long time, this is bad news for the Russian economy.
1.07.2015

Maidan Redux in Armenia?

The Armenian protesters are motivated by socio-economic issues and the desire for social justice—not larger notions of democracy that constitute international human rights advocacy.
29.05.2015

Smiles and Waves: What Xi Jinping Took Away From Moscow

The Xi’s visit to Moscow was the realization of a “win-win” formula beloved by the Chinese. The negotiations between Xi Jinping and Vladimir Putin can be seen as a shared symbolic victory and as a broad declaration of good intentions, but the fight over who can benefit more in practical terms has already begun
14.04.2015

What Did Tsipras and Putin Gain From Their Meeting in Moscow

The Ukraine crisis has made Europeans see Greek foreign policy as particularly threatening and divisive. In reality, Greece is simply acting in line with its long-standing political traditions. The question of European unity still lies in the hands of Brussels and Berlin.
8.04.2015

Iran in the Caucasus: A Long Haul

It will take Iran a long time to make up the ground it has lost in the South Caucasus since the end of the Soviet Union.
20.02.2015

Russo-Turkish and Russo-Indian Nuclear Cooperation: A Template for the Future?

Though largely overlooked by international media, Russia has signed several significant nuclear energy agreements over the last several months. These agreements give Russia an opportunity to develop nuclear cooperation with India, Turkey, and Iran, as well as Bangladesh, Vietnam, and Egypt, where Russia plans to build nuclear plants too.
3.12.2014

Winners and Losers in the Black Sea Gas Game

Calling time on the South Stream pipeline project, Putin announced a new Black Sea pipeline to Turkey instead. The new project could be a competitor to Azerbaijan gas ambitions, but, at the same time, it may require more collaboration in the future.
2.12.2014

OPEC Cuts Into Russian Coffers, But Will Expensive Grand Strategy Live On?

  • Yuval Weber
In reduced economic circumstances the big test for Russia is whether it will be forced to retrench, or whether Vladimir Putin will take his chances on expansionist foreign policy at a moment when there’s less money to go around to combat legitimate threats.
1.12.2014

Anxious in Ankara

Vladimir Putin’s trip to Turkey could help him recover from the cold-shouldering at the G20 summit in Brisbane, but it will not make Ankara abandon its great strategic goal to become an indispensable supplier of natural gas to Europe and a major competitor for Gazprom.
18.11.2014

Turkey’s Strategy for Turkmenistan: What Is Behind Erdoğan’s Last Visit to Ashgabat?

  • Pavel Shlykov
Turkey sees the acute energy market competition as an opportunity to establish itself both as an influential energy state and as a central Eurasian power. In this regard, choosing Turkmenistan as the site of one of the first state visits by the new Turkish president was not accidental.
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